Keith's Rainbow Dhal

        
Keith's Rainbow Dhal

5da97087f27d227954091b97b14b9827.jpg
.
Makes

4

Portions
.Suitable for freezing
.Preparation

10

minutes
.

90

minutes cooking time

Ingredients

Red Layer 
  • 100g aduki beans washed and soaked overnight
  • 200ml stock
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 1 red onion sliced
  • 1 clove garlic crushed
  • 1 tomatoes peeled and chopped
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • Pinch chilli powder
  • 1 tbsp tomato puree
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Gold Layer 
  • 100g split yellow mung beans
  • 300ml stock
  • 1 onion sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 cm of ginger peeled
  • 1 cm of fresh turmeric (optional)
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • ½ tsp mustard seeds
  • Pinch asafoetida
  • ½ tsp ground coriander
  • ½ tsp turmeric powder
  • ½ tsp jaggery (optional)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Green Layer
  • 100g whole moong beans washed and soaked overnight
  • 200ml stock
  • 1 onion
  • ½ tsp turmeric
  • 200g spinach sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic crushed
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Method

Red Layer 
  1. Add the stock and beans to a pan. Bring to the boil then cover with a lid and simmer for about 35 minutes until the beans are tender and most of the liquid has been absorbed. Add more stock if it dries out too quickly.
  2. Melt the oil in a pan and add the onion and garlic. Saute until the onion is softened then add the tomatoes, chilli and paprika. Cook until the tomatoes turn into a pulp. Add this to the beans with the tomato puree. Reheat and simmer for a few minutes. If it is too runny leave the lid off so it thickens. 
  3. Left over Tips: It can be served cold as a red pate. Made into rissoles and fried or baked. Add more stock, vegetables and spices to make an aduki stew. As a striking red pie filling or vegetable stuffing. 
Gold Layer 
  1. Grind the garlic and ginger to a paste using a pestle and mortar or a food processor. 
  2. Melt the oil in a pan and add a few of the mustard seeds. When they start to crackle add the remain seeds. Cover the pan and turn off the heat. Allow the seeds to finish crackling, remove from the stove and carefully add a handful of the chopped onion. Then the powdered spices. Stir then add the rest of the onion and garlic / ginger paste. Now reheat the pan and fry for a minute or two. Off the heat carefully add 50 ml of stock and return to the hob and simmer with a lid for a few minutes. Remove the lid and allow the excess water to evaporate so it is frying again in the oil. 
  3. Now add the moong beans and the rest of the stock. Simmer and cover for about 20 minutes until the beans are soft. Add the jaggery and season to taste. Reheat and simmer for a few minutes. If it is too runny leave the lid off so it thickens. 
  4. Left over Tips: It can be served cold as a yellow pate. Made into rissoles and fried or baked. Add more stock, vegetables and spices to make an dhal. Add to cooked rice to make kitcheri. As a striking yellow pie filling or vegetable stuffing. 
Green Layer
  1. Drain the moong beans and add to a pan with the stock. Cover and simmer for 30 minutes until the beans are soft. Fry the onion and garlic in the oil till tender add the turmeric. Add the spinach and cook until it is reduced. Add to the beans and simmer until they start to break up a bit. If it is too runny leave the lid off so it thickens. 
  2. Left over Tips: It can be served cold as a green pate. Made into rissoles and fried or baked. Add more stock, vegetables and spices to make an dhal. Add to cooked brown rice to make kitcheri. As a striking green pie filling or vegetable stuffing. 

Pulses are not only incredibly nutritious but are also amazingly colourful. We are going to take full advantage of this wonder of nature to create a multicoloured dish. We are even using our favourite Christmas colours red, green and gold. 

The red layer is based on aduki beans, the green using moong beans, then lentils or split moong for gold. 

Pulses are also incredibly versatile. They can be cooked to a soupy consistency like a sauce. Made slightly thicker as a stew or a firmer consistency to make a bake. These recipes are designed to be quite firm so they will sit next to each other and stay separate in a serving dish.

If left to stand and then chilled the dhal becomes much firmer. This can then be used to make a layered loaf or filling for a flan. Or Rainbow Loaf. 

Left over dhal is also incredibly versatile. It can be served cold as a sort of bean pate. Made into rissoles and fried or baked. Add more stock, vegetables and spices to make a different stew or soup. 

Keith Squires

Keith Squires

Keith’s passion for feeding people began with home-baking at the age of 9. He was soon bringing to school cakes, breads and pasties. His schoolmates joined in and before long they were swapping cakes during the lunch breaks, raiding mums’ cookery books in the evenings and even growing their own vegetables in the school grounds.


Keith now combines his background in nutrition, Ayurveda, herbalism and cookery with over 30 years of experience as a vegetarian chef.


He travels widely, teaching in workshops, retreats and courses around the world. 
His events are hugely entertaining as well 
being full of practical knowledge on how to live a healthy and fulfilling lifestyle.


Keith is an experienced UK media presenter, and has made TV appearances in countries as far afield as Greece and India. His popular blog, keithonfood.com, has become a one-stop destination for online inspiration and resources.

Keith is speaking to trainee nurses about plant based eating.

Keith is speaking later in 2018 in India about plant based eating.

Keith has been asked to advise Parliament about plant based eating – so he really does know his stuff!


Some authors are great chefs, others will tell you all about different foods and their nutritional benefits. Many of them are great story-tellers and inspirational writers. 
There are books that are funny and at 
times truly meaningful.

Keith has been featured in and on media all over the UK and is seen as the go to expert for many publications and radio stations.


Keith crams all those qualities into a single volume, His new book ‘Cooking with Love’, which he hopes you won’t be able to 
put down. And not just because your fingers 
are sticky from making the recipes.





Other recipes you may like